Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Wiley-Blackwell Publisher Login
amazon logo
More Info


New from Oxford University Press!

ad

Language Planning as a Sociolinguistic Experiment

By: Ernst Jahr

Provides richly detailed insight into the uniqueness of the Norwegian language development. Marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of the Norwegian nation following centuries of Danish rule


New from Cambridge University Press!

ad

Acquiring Phonology: A Cross-Generational Case-Study

By Neil Smith

The study also highlights the constructs of current linguistic theory, arguing for distinctive features and the notion 'onset' and against some of the claims of Optimality Theory and Usage-based accounts.


New from Brill!

ad

Language Production and Interpretation: Linguistics meets Cognition

By Henk Zeevat

The importance of Henk Zeevat's new monograph cannot be overstated. [...] I recommend it to anyone who combines interests in language, logic, and computation [...]. David Beaver, University of Texas at Austin


Summary Details


Query:   Nonlexical Interjections
Author:  Gina Joue
Submitter Email:  click here to access email
Linguistic LingField(s):   Typology
Lexicography

Summary:   For Query: Linguist 12.320

Hi,

A while back I posted a query for examples of nonlexical interjections in different languages. I only received a few responses -- many thanks to all who responded!!!

These were the responses I received:

Raija Solatie pointed out that air traffic communication can involve a step of ''silent attention'', expressed by the controller or the pilot during which no lexical expression is used in their communication and the step is only a confirmation of transmission of the information.

==================
Jill Brody provided this bibliography:
1995. Lending the 'Unborrowable': Spanish Discourse Markers in Indigenous American Languages, Spanish in Four Continents: Studies in Language Contact and Bilingualism, Carmen Silva-Corval?n, ed. pgs. 132-147. Washington, D.C.:Georgetown University Press.

1994. Multiple Repetitions in Tojolab'al Conversation. In Repetitions in Discourse, Vol. II, ed. Barbara Johnstone, pgs. 3-14. Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

Barbara Johnstone et al. (including Jill Brody). 1994. A Dialogue. In Repetitions in Discourse, Vol. I, ed. Barbara Johnstone, pgs. 1-22. Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

1993. Mayan conversation as interaction. Proceedings of the First Annual Symposium about Language and Society - Austin. Robin Queen and Rusty Barrett, eds. Volume 33, Texas Linguistics Forum. pgs. 234-243. Austin: Department of Linguistics, University of Texas.

1991. Indirection in the Negotiation of Self in Everyday Tojolab'al Women's Conversation. Journal of Linguistic Anthropology 1(1):78-96.

1990. El realce en Tojolab'al. In Lecturas Sobre la Ling??stica Maya, Nora C. England and Stephen R. Elliott, eds. Pgs. 461-472. La Antigua, Guatemala: Centro de Investigaciones Regionales de Mesoam?rica.

[1990] 1989. Alfabetizaci?n y la tradici?n oral: un ejemplo del maya tojolab'al. Tlalocan 11:395-406.

1989. Discourse Markers in Tojolab'al Mayan. Chicago Linguistic Society Parasession on Language in Context. Bradley Music, Randolph Graczyk and Caroline Wiltshire, eds, Chicago: Chicago Linguistic Society, pp. 15-29.

[1989] 1988. Incipient Literacy: From involvement to integration in Tojolab'al Maya. Oral Tradition 3: 315-352.

1988. Discourse Genres in Tojolab'al. In The Tojolab'al Maya: Ethnographic and Linguistic Approaches. M. Jill Brody and John S. Thomas, eds., pgs. 55-62. Geoscience and Man. Volume 26. Baton Rouge: Geoscience Publications, Louisiana State University.

Thomas, John S. and Jill Brody. 1988. The Tojolab'al Maya: Ethnographic and Linguistic Approaches. In The Tojolab'al Maya: Ethnographic and Linguistic Approaches. M. Jill Brody and John S. Thomas, eds., pgs. 1-8. Geoscience and Man. Volume 26. Baton Rouge: Geoscience Publications, Louisiana State University.

[1989] 1987. Particles Borrowed From Spanish as Discourse Markers in Mayan Languages. Anthropological Linguistics 29:507-21.

1987. Creation that Endured: Three Tojolab'al Texts on Origin. Latin American Indian Literatures Journal 3(1):39-58.

Gina, my work that intersects with yours looks at interjections as discourse markers, some of which have been borrowed from another language. The notion of non-lexical is inherently ambiguous for discourse markers, and is extra-blurred in borrowing situations. At any rate, perhaps some of my stuff could help you. I'd like to know more about what you're doing, because I'm fascinated by this stuff. Good luck. Refs below:

[1989] 1987. Particles Borrowed From Spanish as Discourse Markers in Mayan Languages. Anthropological Linguistics 29:507-21.

1989. Discourse Markers in Tojolab'al Mayan. Chicago Linguistic Society Parasession on Language in Context. Bradley Music, Randolph Graczyk and Caroline Wiltshire, eds, Chicago: Chicago Linguistic Society, pp. 15-29.

1995. Lending the 'Unborrowable': Spanish Discourse Markers in Indigenous American Languages, Spanish in Four Continents: Studies in Language Contact and Bilingualism, Carmen Silva-Corval?n, ed. pgs. 132-147. Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press.

1998. On hispanisims in elicitation. Convergencia e Individualidad: Las lenguas mayas entre hispanizaci?n e indigenismo. Andreas Koechert and Thomas Stoltz, eds. (Colecci?n Americana No. 7, Universit?t Bremen), pgs. 61-84. Verlag f?r Ethnologie: Hannover and Guatemala City.

==================

Madalena Cruz-Ferreira pointed out the article

Luthy, M. J. (1983). ''Nonnative speakers' perception of English ''nonlexical'' intonation signals.'' Language Learning 33(1): 19-36.


and provided this helpful compilation of nonlexical interjections in European Portuguese:

(::: indicates a filled pause. The symbols are Sampa.)

European Portuguese non-lexical devices:

Pause-fillers.
The 'default' pause-filler, e.g., in utterance-initial position when replying to a query, is usually a vowel in the area of schwa. This vowel is phonemic in Portuguese. The pause-filler has a mid-level or mid to low-falling tone.

Consonants and other vowels may fill pauses if these are hesitation pauses
e.g. in mid-word or mid-phrase.
Ex.
Q. Queres levar os verdes ou os encarnados? ('Do you want to take the green ones or the red ones?')
A. Os::: verdes podes tu levar. ('You may take the green ones::: yourself'.) (the actual sound involved in these fillers may vary according to sandhi.)


Interjections.
A few are:

[i] for surprise, usually on a falling tone.

[a] for confirmation of the suspected truth of a fact, with a mid-rise, usually followed by the confirmatory statement;
for shock, with a low-fall.
for praise, with a rise-fall.

[O] for disappointment, mid or low-fall.
to call someone's attention, mid or high level preceding the person's name or title. Also used as a phatic device to repeat the addressee's name in mid-conversation.

[aj, uj] for pain or fear, single or reduplicated, [aj] being the commonest, both on falling tones. These two are also used preceding exclamations, with mid-level.

[?@?] for indifference or contempt for the utterance of a previous speaker, on a mid-level and usually together with a shrug. ([?] indicates a glottal stop, non-phonemic in Portuguese.)

[S, Sju] for shushing someone, mid-level or on a falling tone.

[pSt] to request service, e.g., from an attendant in a restaurant, falling tone.

[@~, m] to request repetition of a previous utterance, high-rise.


:-) Gina

LL Issue: 12.1067
Date Posted: 16-Apr-2001
Original Query: Read original query


Back

Sums main page