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Words Onscreen

By Naomi S. Baron

Words Onscreen "explores how technology is reshaping our understanding of what it means to read."


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Communication Accommodation Theory

Edited by Howard Giles

Most people modify their ways of speaking, writing, texting, and e-mailing, and so on, according to the people with whom they are communicating. This fascinating book asks why we 'accommodate' to others in this way, and explores the various social consequences arising from it.


Summary Details


Query:   Vocabulary Statistics
Author:  Richard Hudson
Submitter Email:  click here to access email
Linguistic LingField(s):   Text/Corpus Linguistics

Summary:   A FEW WEEKS AGO I BROADCAST A DOUBLE QUERY ABOUT THE STATISTICS OF ENGLISH
VOCABULARY. MY FIRST QUESTION WAS ABOUT THE NUMBER OF MORPHEMES COMPARED
WITH THE NUMBER OF LEMMAS, BUT NOBODY OFFERED AN ANSWER.

MY SECOND QUESTION WAS MORE SUCCESSFUL. THIS WAS ABOUT THE PROPORTION OF
LEMMAS IN EACH OF THE MAIN WORD CLASSES, AND HOW THIS PROPORTION VARIED
WITH TOKEN FREQUENCY; I WAS PARTICULARLY KEEN TO CHECK A GUESS THAT THE
PROPORTION OF NOUNS WAS GREATER AMONG RARE LEMMAS THAN AMONG COMMON ONES. I
RECEIVED DATA FROM GWILLIM LAW AND JASPER HOLMES. IT TURNS OUT THAT MY
GUESS WAS RIGHT. I'VE PRESENTED AND SUMMARISEDTHE DATA AT
HTTP://WWW.PHON.UCL.AC.UK/HOME/DICK/NOUNINESS/NOUNINESS.HTM. IF ANYONE HAS
COMMENTS OR FURTHER DATA (INCLUDING DATA ON OTHER LANGUAGES), I SHOULD OF
COURSE BE MOST INTERESTED TO HEAR FROM THEM.

LL Issue: 20.413
Date Posted: 09-Feb-2009
Original Query: Read original query