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Speaking American: A History of English in the United States

By Richard W. Bailey

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Language, Literacy, and Technology

By Richard Kern

"In this book, Richard Kern explores how technology matters to language and the ways in which we use it. Kern reveals how material, social and individual resources interact in the design of textual meaning, and how that interaction plays out across contexts of communication, different situations of technological mediation, and different moments in time."


Academic Paper


Title: Social class and gender impacting change in bilingual settings: Spanish subject pronoun use in New York
Author: Naomi Lapidus Shin
Institution: University of New Mexico
Author: Ricardo Otheguy
Institution: City University of New York
Linguistic Field: Sociolinguistics
Subject Language: English
Spanish
Abstract: This study examines the role of social class and gender in an ongoing change in Spanish spoken in New York City (NYC). The change, which has to do with increasing use of Spanish subject pronouns, is correlated with increased exposure to life in NYC and to English. Our investigation of six different national-origin groups shows a connection between affluence and change: the most affluent Latino groups undergo the most increase in pronoun use, while the least affluent undergo no change. This pattern is explained as further indication that resistance to linguistic change is more pronounced in poorer communities as a result of denser social networks. In addition we find a women effect: immigrant women lead men in the increasing use of pronouns. We argue that the women effect in bilingual settings warrants a reevaluation of existing explanations of women as leaders of linguistic change. (Language change, social class, gender, bilingualism, Spanish in the US, pronouns)

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Language in Society Vol. 42, Issue 4, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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