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The Social Origins of Language

By Daniel Dor

Presents a new theoretical framework for the origins of human language and sets key issues in language evolution in their wider context within biological and cultural evolution


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Preposition Placement in English: A Usage-Based Approach

By Thomas Hoffmann

This is the first study that empirically investigates preposition placement across all clause types. The study compares first-language (British English) and second-language (Kenyan English) data and will therefore appeal to readers interested in world Englishes. Over 100 authentic corpus examples are discussed in the text, which will appeal to those who want to see 'real data'


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Free Access 4 You

Free access to several Brill linguistics journals, such as Journal of Jewish Languages, Language Dynamics and Change, and Brill’s Annual of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics.


Academic Paper


Title: A story about a word: does narrative presentation promote learning of a spatial preposition in German two-year-olds?
Author: Kerstin Nachtigäller
Institution: Universität Bielefeld
Author: Katharina J. Rohlfing
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://wwwhomes.uni-bielefeld.de/rohlfing/
Institution: Universität Bielefeld
Author: Karla K Mcgregor
Institution: University of Iowa
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition
Subject Language: German
Abstract: We trained forty German-speaking children aged 1;8–2;0 in their comprehension of UNTER [UNDER]. The target word was presented within semantically organized input in the form of a ‘narrative’ to the experimental group and within ‘unconnected speech’ to the control group. We tested children's learning by asking them to perform an UNDER-relation before, immediately after, and again one day after the training using familiarized and unfamiliarized materials. Compared to controls, the experimental group learned better and retained more. Children with advanced expressive lexicons in particular were aided in generalizing to unfamiliarized materials by the narrative presentation. This study extends our understanding of how narrations scaffold young children's enrichment of nascent word knowledge.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Journal of Child Language Vol. 40, Issue 4, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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