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It's Been Said Before

By Orin Hargraves

It's Been Said Before "examines why certain phrases become clichés and why they should be avoided -- or why they still have life left in them."

New from Cambridge University Press!


Sounds Fascinating

By J. C. Wells

How do you pronounce biopic, synod, and Breughel? - and why? Do our cake and archaic sound the same? Where does the stress go in stalagmite? What's odd about the word epergne? As a finale, the author writes a letter to his 16-year-old self.

Academic Paper

Title: A story about a word: does narrative presentation promote learning of a spatial preposition in German two-year-olds?
Author: Kerstin Nachtigäller
Institution: Universität Bielefeld
Author: Katharina J. Rohlfing
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: Universität Bielefeld
Author: Karla K Mcgregor
Institution: University of Iowa
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition
Subject Language: German
Abstract: We trained forty German-speaking children aged 1;8–2;0 in their comprehension of UNTER [UNDER]. The target word was presented within semantically organized input in the form of a ‘narrative’ to the experimental group and within ‘unconnected speech’ to the control group. We tested children's learning by asking them to perform an UNDER-relation before, immediately after, and again one day after the training using familiarized and unfamiliarized materials. Compared to controls, the experimental group learned better and retained more. Children with advanced expressive lexicons in particular were aided in generalizing to unfamiliarized materials by the narrative presentation. This study extends our understanding of how narrations scaffold young children's enrichment of nascent word knowledge.


This article appears IN Journal of Child Language Vol. 40, Issue 4.

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