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Words in Time and Place: Exploring Language Through the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary

By David Crystal

Offers a unique view of the English language and its development, and includes witty commentary and anecdotes along the way.


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The Indo-European Controversy: Facts and Fallacies in Historical Linguistics

By Asya Pereltsvaig and Martin W. Lewis

This book "asserts that the origin and spread of languages must be examined primarily through the time-tested techniques of linguistic analysis, rather than those of evolutionary biology" and "defends traditional practices in historical linguistics while remaining open to new techniques, including computational methods" and "will appeal to readers interested in world history and world geography."


Academic Paper


Title: The odd-parity input problem in metrical stress theory
Author: Brett Hyde
Institution: Washington University, St. Louis
Linguistic Field: Phonology
Abstract: Under the weak layering approach to prosodic structure (Itô & Mester ), the requirement that output forms be exhaustively parsed into binary feet, even when the input contains an odd-number of syllables, results in the , which consists of two sub-problems. The is a pathological type of quantity-sensitivity where a single odd-numbered heavy syllable in an odd-parity output is parsed as a monosyllabic foot. The is the systematic conversion of odd-parity inputs to even-parity outputs. The article examines the typology of binary stress patterns predicted by two approaches, symmetrical alignment (McCarthy & Prince ) and iterative foot optimisation (Pruitt , ), to demonstrate that the odd-parity input problem is pervasive in weak layering accounts. It then demonstrates that the odd-parity input problem can be avoided altogether under the alternative structural assumptions of weak bracketing (Hyde ).

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Phonology Vol. 29, Issue 3, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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