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Academic Paper


Title: Effect of multiple translations and cognate status on translation recognition performance of balanced bilinguals
Author: Roger Boada
Institution: Rovira i Virgili University
Author: Rosa Sánchez-Casas
Institution: Rovira i Virgili University
Author: José M. Gavilán
Institution: Rovira i Virgili University
Author: José Eugenio García-Albea
Institution: Rovira i Virgili University
Author: Natasha Tokowicz
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition
Subject Language: Spanish
Catalan-Valencian-Balear
Abstract: When participants are asked to translate an ambiguous word, they are slower and less accurate than in the case of single-translation words (e.g., Láxen & Lavour, 2010; Tokowicz & Kroll, 2007). We report an experiment to further examine this multiple-translation effect by investigating the influence of variables shown to be relevant in bilingual processing. The experiment included cognates and non-cognates with one translation or with multiple translations. The latter were presented with their dominant or subordinate translations. Highly-proficient balanced bilinguals responded to a translation recognition task in the two language directions (Catalan–Spanish and Spanish–Catalan). The results showed a significant multiple-translation effect in both cognates and non-cognates. Moreover, this effect was obtained regardless of language dominance and translation direction. Participants were faster and more accurate when performing translation recognition for the dominant than for the subordinate translations. The findings are interpreted adopting the Distributed Representation Model (de Groot, 1992b).

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Bilingualism: Language and Cognition Vol. 16, Issue 1, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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