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Latin: A Linguistic Introduction

By Renato Oniga and Norma Shifano

Applies the principles of contemporary linguistics to the study of Latin and provides clear explanations of grammatical rules alongside diagrams to illustrate complex structures.


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The Ancient Language, and the Dialect of Cornwall, with an Enlarged Glossary of Cornish Provincial Words

By Frederick W.P. Jago

Containing around 3,700 dialect words from both Cornish and English,, this glossary was published in 1882 by Frederick W. P. Jago (1817–92) in an effort to describe and preserve the dialect as it too declined and it is an invaluable record of a disappearing dialect and way of life.


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Linguistic Bibliography for the Year 2013

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Academic Paper


Title: The Self-Organization of Speech Sounds
Paper URL: http://www.csl.sony.fr/~py/publications.htm
Author: Pierre-Yves Oudeyer
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://www.csl.sony.fr/~py
Institution: Sony Computer Science Laboratory, Paris
Linguistic Field: Cognitive Science; Computational Linguistics; Historical Linguistics; Neurolinguistics; Sociolinguistics
Abstract: The speech code is a vehicle of language: it defines a set of forms used by a/L/community to carry information. Such a code is necessary to support the linguistic/L/interactions that allow humans to communicate. How then may a speech code be/L/formed prior to the existence of linguistic interactions? Moreover, the human speech/L/code is discrete and compositional, shared by all the individuals of a community/L/but different across communities, and phoneme inventories are characterized by/L/statistical regularities. How can a speech code with these properties form?/L/We try to approach these questions in the paper, using the "methodology of/L/the artificial". We build a society of artificial agents, and detail a mechanism that/L/shows the formation of a discrete speech code without pre-supposing the existence/L/of linguistic capacities or of coordinated interactions. The mechanism is based on/L/a low-level model of sensory-motor interactions. We show that the integration of/L/certain very simple and non language-specific neural devices leads to the formation/L/of a speech code that has properties similar to the human speech code. This result/L/relies on the self-organizing properties of a generic coupling between perception and/L/production within agents, and on the interactions between agents. The artificial/L/system helps us to develop better intuitions on how speech might have appeared,/L/by showing how self-organization might have helped natural selection to find speech.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Venue: Journal of Theoretical Biology
Publication Info: Oudeyer, P-Y. (2005) The Self-Organization of Speech Sounds, Journal of Theoretical Biology, 233(3), pp. 435--449.
URL: http://www.csl.sony.fr/~py/publications.htm


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