Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Wiley-Blackwell Publisher Login
amazon logo
More Info


New from Oxford University Press!

ad

Latin: A Linguistic Introduction

By Renato Oniga and Norma Shifano

Applies the principles of contemporary linguistics to the study of Latin and provides clear explanations of grammatical rules alongside diagrams to illustrate complex structures.


New from Cambridge University Press!

ad

The Ancient Language, and the Dialect of Cornwall, with an Enlarged Glossary of Cornish Provincial Words

By Frederick W.P. Jago

Containing around 3,700 dialect words from both Cornish and English,, this glossary was published in 1882 by Frederick W. P. Jago (1817–92) in an effort to describe and preserve the dialect as it too declined and it is an invaluable record of a disappearing dialect and way of life.


New from Brill!

ad

Linguistic Bibliography for the Year 2013

The Linguistic Bibliography is by far the most comprehensive bibliographic reference work in the field. This volume contains up-to-date and extensive indexes of names, languages, and subjects.


Academic Paper


Title: Naming people in Tunisian Arabic: An idealized cognitive model
Author: Zouhair Maalej
Email: click here to access email
Institution: University of Manouba
Linguistic Field: Cognitive Science
Abstract: Naming people has been studied referentially (Quirk et al, 1972), etymologically (Jaekel, 1999), pragmatically (Marmaridou, 1989), and syntactico-semantically (Van Langendonck, 1999). The present paper, however, offers a cognitive semantic view of naming in Tunisian Arabic (TA) as an Idealised Cognitive Model (Lakoff, 1987; Langacker, 1991). First names are regarded as semantically motivated but unconscious strategies, describing a propositional model (Lakoff, 1987), a LINK image-schema (Lakoff, 1987; Johnson, 1987), a part-whole metonymic model (Lakoff, 1987), and a motivated metaphoric mapping (Lakoff and Johnson, 1980-1999). Prototypically, first names in TA rely on a conceptual domain either recruited from within the experience of name-givers or are the outcome of a desirable state of affairs on the part of name-givers. Such a desirable state of affairs is the product of an imaginative projection on the part of name-givers, who build this projection from within emotions, morality, beauty, piety, etc. The conceptual metaphors capitalized upon in naming reveal name-givers' perception of males and females in TA, with blatant bias to the former. The result is a cultural model of naming, whereby conceptual metaphors interface with derivational morphology.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: In Progress
Venue: Department of Linguistics, UNM
Publication Info: Paper read to the HDLS (UNM, Albuquerque, 1-2 November 2002)


Back
Add a new paper
Return to Academic Papers main page
Return to Directory of Linguists main page