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Academic Paper


Title: Interactional Feedback and Instructional Counterbalance
Author: Roy Lyster
Institution: McGill University
Author: Hirohide Mori
Institution: Nihon University 日本大学
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Discourse Analysis; Language Acquisition
Subject Language: French
Japanese
Abstract: This comparative analysis of teacher-student interaction in two different instructional settings at the elementary-school level (18.3 hr in French immersion and 14.8 hr Japanese immersion) investigates the immediate effects of explicit correction, recasts, and prompts on learner uptake and repair. The results clearly show a predominant provision of recasts over prompts and explicit correction, regardless of instructional setting, but distinctively varied student uptake and repair patterns in relation to feedback type, with the largest proportion of repair resulting from prompts in French immersion and from recasts in Japanese immersion. Based on these findings and supported by an analysis of each instructional setting's overall communicative orientation, we introduce the counterbalance hypothesis, which states that instructional activities and interactional feedback that act as a counterbalance to a classroom's predominant communicative orientation are likely to prove more effective than instructional activities and interactional feedback that are congruent with its predominant communicative orientation.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Studies in Second Language Acquisition Vol. 28, Issue 2, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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