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Academic Paper


Title: Using Stimulated Recall to Investigate Native Speaker Perceptions in Native-Nonnative Speaker Interaction
Author: Charlene Polio
Institution: Michigan State University
Author: Susan M. Gass
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: https://www.msu.edu/~gass/
Institution: Michigan State University, USA
Author: Laura Chapin
Institution: Michigan State University
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition; Sociolinguistics
Abstract: Implicit negative feedback has been shown to facilitate Second Language Acquisition (SLA), and the extent to which such feedback is given is related to a variety of task and interlocutor variables. The background of a native speaker (NS), in terms of amount of experience in interactions with nonnative speakers (NNSs), has been shown to affect the quantity of implicit negative feedback (namely recasts) in a classroom setting. This study examines the effect of experience and uses stimulated recall to attempt to understand the interactional patterns of two groups of NSs (with greater and lesser experience) interacting with second language (L2) learners outside of the classroom context.

Two groups of NSs of English each completed an information exchange task with a L2 learner: The first group consisted of 11 preservice teachers with minimal experience with NNSs, whereas the second group included 8 experienced teachers with significant teaching experience. Immediately after the task, each NS participated in a stimulated recall, viewing a videotape of the interaction and commenting on the interaction. The quantitative results did not show a strong difference in the number of recasts used by the two groups, but it did show a difference in the quantity of NNS output between the two groups. This finding was corroborated by the stimulated recalls, which showed that those with experience--who clearly saw themselves as language teachers even outside of the classroom--had strategies for and concerns about getting the learners to produce output. Additionally, the experienced teachers showed greater recognition of student comprehension, student learning, and student problems. Those with little experience were more focused on themselves, on student feelings, and on procedural and
task-related issues.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Studies in Second Language Acquisition Vol. 28, Issue 2, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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