Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Wiley-Blackwell Publisher Login
amazon logo
More Info


New from Oxford University Press!

ad

Words in Time and Place: Exploring Language Through the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary

By David Crystal

Offers a unique view of the English language and its development, and includes witty commentary and anecdotes along the way.


New from Cambridge University Press!

ad

Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases

By Peter Mark Roget

This book "supplies a vocabulary of English words and idiomatic phrases 'arranged … according to the ideas which they express'. The thesaurus, continually expanded and updated, has always remained in print, but this reissued first edition shows the impressive breadth of Roget's own knowledge and interests."


New from Brill!

ad

The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek

By Franco Montanari

Coming soon: The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek by Franco Montanari is the most comprehensive dictionary for Ancient Greek to English for the 21st Century. Order your copy now!


Academic Paper


Title: Los tiempos verbales como marcadores evidenciales. El caso del pretérito perfecto compuesto
Author: Fernando Bermúdez
Email: click here to access email
Institution: Stockholm University
Linguistic Field: Cognitive Science; Morphology; Pragmatics; Semantics
Subject Language: Spanish
Abstract: Although it is widely recognized that people in everyday situations uses tense morphemes “atypically” (for example present tense used to describe events which are clearly in the past or past tense used to describe present or future events), most researchers insist on the idea that the main task of tense morphology is to encode temporality. In this paper we argue against this received theory of tense and propose instead an interpretation of tense morphemes as evidentiality/modality markers. Moreover, an analysis of the River Plate Spanish present perfect is proposed that relies on this interpretation. All meanings attributed to the present perfect in the literature (resultative, iterative, mirative, grade of commitment, formality) are explained as extensions of the core evidential meaning, namely “according to available evidence, I conclude/state X”.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Publication Info: Estudios Filológicos 40, 165-188


Back
Add a new paper
Return to Academic Papers main page
Return to Directory of Linguists main page