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Vowel Length From Latin to Romance

By Michele Loporcaro

This book "draws on extensive empirical data, including from lesser known varieties" and "puts forward a new account of a well-known diachronic phenomenon."


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Letter Writing and Language Change

Edited By Anita Auer, Daniel Schreier, and Richard J. Watts

This book "challenges the assumption that there is only one 'legitimate' and homogenous form of English or of any other language" and "supports the view of different/alternative histories of the English language and will appeal to readers who are skeptical of 'standard' language ideology."


Academic Paper


Title: S marks the spot? Regional variation and early African American
Author: Gerard Van Herk
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: Memorial University
Author: James A. Walker
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://www.yorku.ca/jamesw
Institution: York University
Linguistic Field: General Linguistics; Sociolinguistics; Historical Linguistics
Subject Language: English
Abstract: The different population ecologies of slavery-era America necessitate an investigation into the issue of regional variation in Early African American English (AAE). This article addresses this issue through the Ottawa Repository of Early African American Correspondence, a corpus of letters written by semiliterate African American settlers in Liberia between 1834 and 1866. We investigate nonstandard verbal -s and its conditioning by linguistic and social factors, including each writer's regional origin in the United States. Results show that, despite differences in overall rates across regions, the linguistic conditioning largely remains constant. These results suggest that subtle regional distinctions in Early AAE existed when specific settlement and population ecologies encouraged them, but that the shared history and circumstances of language contact and development led to an overall identity of forms and conditioning factors across regional varieties.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Language Variation and Change Vol. 17, Issue 2, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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