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Words in Time and Place: Exploring Language Through the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary

By David Crystal

Offers a unique view of the English language and its development, and includes witty commentary and anecdotes along the way.


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The Indo-European Controversy: Facts and Fallacies in Historical Linguistics

By Asya Pereltsvaig and Martin W. Lewis

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Academic Paper


Title: Spatial and temporal boundedness in English motion events
Paper URL: https://www.academia.edu/1432969/Spatial_and_temporal_boundedness_in_English_motion_events
Author: Bert Cappelle
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://stl.recherche.univ-lille3.fr/sitespersonnels/cappelle/
Institution: Université Lille - Nord de France
Linguistic Field: Pragmatics; Semantics; Syntax
Subject Language: English
Abstract: This study examines how reference to spatial boundaries can make speakers of English represent or understand a motion event as temporally bounded. Spatial boundaries can be implied by (a) the path expressed by a directional item, (b) the so-called "landmark" [Langacker, Ronald W., 1987. Foundations of Cognitive Grammar, vol. I: Theoretical Perspectives. Stanford University Press, Stanford.] serving as 'support' for the path, and (c) the moving entity. Importantly, one and the same entity in the real world can also be conceptualized as either primarily delimited (bounded) or extended (nonbounded)./L//L/After setting the stage with an example (Section 1) and dealing with some important terminological preliminaries (Section 2), we take a closer look at the concept of boundaries (Section 3). We then set up a four-way classification of directional prepositions in English (Section 4), based on whether they refer to a path that is extended and, if so, on whether that path is specified or not for having or lacking an end-boundary./L//L/In the subsequent Sections 5–7, we zoom in on the aspectual role played by adverbial particles, on the possible influence of the object NP of directional prepositions, and briefly on the role played by the NP referring to the moving entity./L//L/The most important findings of this study are summarized in Section 8.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Venue: Journal of Pragmatics, Volume 37, Issue 6, June 2005, Pages 889-917
Publication Info: Received 18 March 2004; revised 10 September 2004; accepted 8 October 2004. Available online 7 December 2004.
URL: https://www.academia.edu/1432969/Spatial_and_temporal_boundedness_in_English_motion_events


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