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The Social Origins of Language

By Daniel Dor

Presents a new theoretical framework for the origins of human language and sets key issues in language evolution in their wider context within biological and cultural evolution


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Preposition Placement in English: A Usage-Based Approach

By Thomas Hoffmann

This is the first study that empirically investigates preposition placement across all clause types. The study compares first-language (British English) and second-language (Kenyan English) data and will therefore appeal to readers interested in world Englishes. Over 100 authentic corpus examples are discussed in the text, which will appeal to those who want to see 'real data'


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Free Access 4 You

Free access to several Brill linguistics journals, such as Journal of Jewish Languages, Language Dynamics and Change, and Brill’s Annual of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics.


Academic Paper


Title: Variation in Standard Dutch vowels: The impact of formant measurement methods on identifying the speaker's regional origin
Author: Sander Van der Harst
Institution: Centre for Language Studies, Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen
Author: Hans Van de Velde
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://www.let.uu.nl/~Hans.vandeVelde/personal
Institution: Universiteit Utrecht
Author: Roeland van Hout
Institution: Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen
Linguistic Field: Phonetics; Sociolinguistics
Subject Language: Dutch
Abstract: It is common practice in sociophonetics to measure vowel formants at one (monophthongs) or two (diphthongs) time points. This paper compares this traditional target approach with two dynamic approaches for investigating regional patterns of variation: the multiple time point approach, which measures formants at successive time points, and the regression approach, which estimates formant dynamics over time by fitting polynomial regression equations to formant contours. The speech material consisted of monosyllabic words containing all full vowels of Dutch, except for /y/. These words were read out by 160 speakers of Standard Dutch, who were distributed over four regions in the Netherlands and four regions in Flanders, Belgium. The results show that dynamic approaches outperform the target approach in uncovering regional vowel differences, which suggests that sociophonetic vowel studies that apply the target approach run the risk of overlooking important sociolinguistic patterns.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Language Variation and Change Vol. 26, Issue 2, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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