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Words in Time and Place: Exploring Language Through the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary

By David Crystal

Offers a unique view of the English language and its development, and includes witty commentary and anecdotes along the way.


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Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases

By Peter Mark Roget

This book "supplies a vocabulary of English words and idiomatic phrases 'arranged … according to the ideas which they express'. The thesaurus, continually expanded and updated, has always remained in print, but this reissued first edition shows the impressive breadth of Roget's own knowledge and interests."


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The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek

By Franco Montanari

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Academic Paper


Title: The effects of audiovisual support on EFL learners’ productive vocabulary
Author: Wenhua Hsu
Institution: I-Shou University
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Language Acquisition
Subject Language: English
Abstract: This study concerned multiple exposures to English before writing and aimed to explore the possibility of an increase in free active vocabulary with a focus on latent productive vocabulary beyond the first 2,000 most frequent words. The researcher incorporated online video into her college freshman composition class and examined its effects on non-basic vocabulary use. To activate previously known vocabulary, a variety of audiovisual modes before writing were applied to four groups alternately: (1) video with captions, (2) video without captions, (3) silent video with captions, and (4) video with screen off (soundtrack only). The results show that the writing involving non-captioned videos contained a higher percentage of advanced vocabulary than that with the other three conditions (specifically, 12.45% versus 11.33% with captioned videos, 5.2% with silent but captioned videos and 8.63% with audio only). Drawing upon the dual-coding theory, this study also points out some pedagogical implications for a video-based writing course.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in ReCALL Vol. 26, Issue 1, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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