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Evolutionary Syntax

By Ljiljana Progovac

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The Making of Vernacular Singapore English

By Zhiming Bao

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Academic Paper


Title: The acquisition of passives in Serbian
Author: Alexandra Perovic
Institution: University College London
Author: Jasmina Vuksanović
Institution: State University of Novi Pazar
Author: Boban Petrović
Institution: University of Belgrade
Author: Irena Avramović-Ilić
Institution: University of Belgrade
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Psycholinguistics
Subject Language: Serbian
Abstract: This study examined the comprehension of actional and psychological verbs in both their active and passive (short and long) forms by 99 Serbian-speaking children. The children, whose age ranged between 3 years, 6 months (3;6) and 7 years, 6 months (7;6), were divided into three groups: 3;6–5 (M = 4.3), 5;1–6;1 (M = 5.6), and 6;2–7;6 (M = 7.0). All groups reached ceiling performance on actives of both actional and psychological verbs. They showed a good performance on passives of actional verbs, both short and long, but an exceptionally low performance on passives of psychological verbs: only the oldest group, 7-year-olds, reached 80% correct performance on psychological passives. There were no differences in the children's performance on short versus long passives of either type of the verb. These results are in line with studies reporting delayed passive comprehension in children younger than 5 in a number of languages, suggesting a delay in the comprehension of this structure cross-linguistically. The discrepancy observed in the comprehension of psychological passives, as opposed to actional actives, fits neatly into Borer and Wexler's account, which relates children's difficulties in this area to their underlying knowledge of argument chains created by movement of sentential elements.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Applied Psycholinguistics Vol. 35, Issue 1, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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