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Academic Paper


Title: Exploring the Language of a Play: A linguistic analysis of Tagore's Chitra
Author: Upendra Gami
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: SRM University
Linguistic Field: Ling & Literature
Abstract: Rabindranath Tagore’s Chitra, a play in one act, abounds in stylistic features. Tagore’s dexterous use of figurative language is indisputably inimitable. The play is a creative adoption of an exquisitely beautiful love story of the legendary lovers, Chitra and Arjuna, which forms a memorable episode in The Mahabharata. So the content and the style of presentation are in quite congruence in the play. There are only two levels in the discourse structure of the play — at the first or overarching level the writer is the addresser and the reader the addressee, and the text of the play forms the message, while at the second or embedded level are the characters in the play as the addressers and the addressees and what the characters communicate to each other forms the message. There is no other level of discourse between the character as the addresser and the reader as the addressee. The dramatic discourse consists of all the five major speech acts of constative, directive, commissive, expressive, and declarative. The plenteous use of parallelism is one of the outstanding features of the play. Sheer magical music flows throughout the drama. Ample alliterations are aptly used in the play for the sake of running rhythm which makes Chitra a lyric in prose. Cohesive devices have cautiously been interwoven in the colourful canvas of the play. The systemic choices made by the playwright are indeed worth-noting. By deleting stage directions, Tagore has meticulously made the play a reader’s drama which offers pristine delight while making a diligent reading.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Publication Info: Ars Artium, Volume- I Paragon International, 2013, pp.143-151


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