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Words Onscreen

By Naomi S. Baron

Words Onscreen "explores how technology is reshaping our understanding of what it means to read."


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Communication Accommodation Theory

Edited by Howard Giles

Most people modify their ways of speaking, writing, texting, and e-mailing, and so on, according to the people with whom they are communicating. This fascinating book asks why we 'accommodate' to others in this way, and explores the various social consequences arising from it.


Academic Paper


Title: Longitudinal predictors of Chinese word reading and spelling among elementary grade students
Author: Pui-Sze Yeung
Institution: University of Hong Kong
Author: Connie Suk-Han Ho
Institution: University of Hong Kong
Author: Yau-Kai Wong
Institution: University of Hong Kong
Author: David Wai-Ock Chan
Institution: Chinese University of Hong Kong
Author: Kevin K. H. Chung
Institution: University of Hong Kong
Author: Lap-Yan Lo
Institution: University of Hong Kong
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Language Acquisition
Subject Language: Chinese, Mandarin
Abstract: The longitudinal predictive power of four important reading-related skills (phonological skills, rapid naming, orthographic skills, and morphological awareness) to Chinese word reading and writing to dictation (i.e., spelling) was examined in a 3-year longitudinal study among 251 Chinese elementary students. Rapid naming, orthographic skills, and morphological awareness assessed in Grade 1 were significant longitudinal predictors of Chinese word reading in Grades 1 to 4. As for word spelling, rapid naming was the only significant predictor across grades. Morphological awareness was a robust predictor of word spelling in Grade 1 only. Phonological skills and orthographic skills significantly predicted word spelling in Grades 2 and 4. After controlling for autoregressive effects, morphological awareness and orthographic skills were the significant longitudinal predictors of Chinese word reading and word spelling, respectively. These findings reflected the impacts of the Chinese orthography on children's reading and spelling development.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Applied Psycholinguistics Vol. 34, Issue 6.

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