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The Vulgar Tongue: Green's History of Slang

By Jonathon Green

A comprehensive history of slang in the English speaking world by its leading lexicographer.


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The Universal Structure of Categories: Towards a Formal Typology

By Martina Wiltschko

This book presents a new theory of grammatical categories - the Universal Spine Hypothesis - and reinforces generative notions of Universal Grammar while accommodating insights from linguistic typology.


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Academic Paper


Title: On the semantics of noun compounds
Author: Stan Szpakowicz
Homepage: http://www.site.uottawa.ca/~szpak
Institution: University of Ottawa
Author: Francis C. Bond
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://www3.ntu.edu.sg/home/fcbond/
Institution: Nanyang Technological University
Author: Preslav Ivanov Nakov
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://www.qcri.qa/our-people/bio?pid=35
Institution: QCRI, Qatar Foundation
Author: Su Nam Kim
Institution: Monash University
Linguistic Field: Computational Linguistics
Abstract: The noun compound – a sequence of nouns which functions as a single noun – is very common in English texts. No language processing system should ignore expressions like steel soup pot cover if it wants to be serious about such high-end applications of computational linguistics as question answering, information extraction, text summarization, machine translation – the list goes on. Processing noun compounds, however, is far from trouble-free. For one thing, they can be bracketed in various ways: is it steel soup, steel pot, or steel cover? Then there are relations inside a compound, annoyingly not signalled by any words: does pot contain soup or is it for cooking soup? These and many other research challenges are the subject of this special issue.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Natural Language Engineering Vol. 19, Issue 3, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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