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Academic Paper

Title: A contrastive corpus-based analysis of the frequency of discourse markers in NE and NNE media discourse: Implications for a “universal discourse competence”
Paper URL:
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Discourse Analysis; Language Acquisition; Text/Corpus Linguistics
Abstract: This article examines whether there are differences in the frequency of discourse markers (DMs) between Native English (NE) and Non-native English (NNE) corpora of political media discourse. Based on the grammatical-pragmatic perspective of discourse markers (Fraser, 2004), the discourse markers identified in the corpora were divided into four semantic categories: contrastive discourse markers (CDM), elaborative discourse markers (EDM), implicative discourse markers (IDM) and temporal discourse markers (TDM). The results revealed that: (i) in both corpora, implicative discourse markers (IDMs) and elaborative discourse markers (EDMs) have the lowest and highest frequency counts respectively, (ii) there are significant differences across the four types of discourse markers in both corpora, (iii) there is no significant difference in the aggregated frequency of discourse markers across NE and NNE political news discourse, and (iv) there are no relative NE/NNE frequency differences within each category of discourse markers. The findings point to the need for revisiting Kaplan's contrastive rhetoric, and provide evidence for the plausibility of a “ universal discourse competence” in advanced NNE written discourse.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Publication Info: Corpus Linguistics and Linguistic Theory. Volume 9, Issue 1, Pages 39–69, ISSN (Online) 1613-7035, ISSN (Print) 1613-7027, DOI: 10.1515/cllt-2013-0010, May 2013

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