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The Cambridge Handbook of Pragmatics

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This book "fills the unquestionable need for a comprehensive and up-to-date handbook on the fast-developing field of pragmatics" and "includes contributions from many of the principal figures in a wide variety of fields of pragmatic research as well as some up-and-coming pragmatists."


Academic Paper


Title: An expectation-based account of subject islands and parasitism
Author: Rui Pedro Chaves
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~rchaves/
Institution: University at Buffalo
Linguistic Field: Pragmatics; Syntax
Abstract: Subject phrases impose particularly strong constraints on extraction. Most research assumes a syntactic account (e.g. Kayne , Chomsky , Rizzi , Lasnik & Saito , Takahashi , Uriagereka ), but there are also pragmatic accounts (Erteschik-Shir & Lappin ; Van Valin , ; Erteschik-Shir , ) as well as performance-based approaches (Kluender ). In this work I argue that none of these accounts captures the full range of empirical facts, and show that subject and adjunct phrases (phrasal or clausal, finite or otherwise) are by no means impermeable to non-parasitic extraction of nominal, prepositional and adverbial phrases. The present empirical reassessment indicates that the phenomena involving subject and adjunct islands defies the formulation of a general grammatical account. Drawing from insights by Engdahl () and Kluender (), I argue that subject island effects have a functional explanation. Independently motivated pragmatic and processing limitations cause subject-internal gaps to be heavily dispreferred, and therefore, extremely infrequent. In turn, this has led to heuristic parsing expectations that preempt subject-internal gaps and therefore speed up processing by pruning the search space of filler–gap dependencies. Such expectations cause processing problems when violated, unless they are dampened by prosodic and pragmatic cues that boost the construction of the correct parse. This account predicts subject islands and their (non-)parasitic exceptions.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Journal of Linguistics Vol. 49, Issue 2, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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