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It's Been Said Before

By Orin Hargraves

It's Been Said Before "examines why certain phrases become clichés and why they should be avoided -- or why they still have life left in them."

New from Cambridge University Press!


Sounds Fascinating

By J. C. Wells

How do you pronounce biopic, synod, and Breughel? - and why? Do our cake and archaic sound the same? Where does the stress go in stalagmite? What's odd about the word epergne? As a finale, the author writes a letter to his 16-year-old self.

Academic Paper

Title: Stimulus variability and perceptual learning of nonnative vowel categories
Author: Françoise Brosseau-Lapré
Institution: McGill University
Author: Susan Rvachew
Institution: McGill University
Author: Meghan Clayards
Institution: McGill University
Author: Daniel Dickson
Institution: McGill University
Linguistic Field: Phonology; Psycholinguistics
Abstract: English-speakers' learning of a French vowel contrast (/ə/–/ø/) was examined under six different stimulus conditions in which contrastive and noncontrastive stimulus dimensions were varied orthogonally to each other. The distribution of contrastive cues was varied across training conditions to create single prototype, variable far (from the category boundary), and variable close (to the boundary) conditions, each in a single talker or a multiple talker version. The control condition involved identification of gender appropriate grammatical elements. Pre- and posttraining measures of vowel perception and production were obtained from each participant. When assessing pre- to posttraining changes in the slope of the identification functions, statistically significant training effects were observed in the multiple voice far and multiple voice close conditions.


This article appears IN Applied Psycholinguistics Vol. 34, Issue 3.

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