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Linguistic Diversity and Social Justice

By Ingrid Piller

Linguistic Diversity and Social Justice "prompts thinking about linguistic disadvantage as a form of structural disadvantage that needs to be recognized and taken seriously."


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Language Evolution: The Windows Approach

By Rudolf Botha

Language Evolution: The Windows Approach addresses the question: "How can we unravel the evolution of language, given that there is no direct evidence about it?"


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Academic Paper


Title: Abstract knowledge of word order by 19 months: An eye-tracking study
Author: Julie Franck
Institution: University of Geneva
Author: Severine Millan
Institution: University of Dijon
Author: Andres Posada
Institution: University of Geneva
Author: Luigi Rizzi
Institution: Università degli Studi di Siena
Linguistic Field: Psycholinguistics
Abstract: Word order is one of the earliest aspects of grammar that the child acquires, because her early utterances already respect the basic word order of the target language. However, the question of the nature of early syntactic representations is subject to debate. Approaches inspired by formal syntax assume that the head–complement order, differentiating verb–object and object–verb languages, is represented very early on in an abstract, rulelike format. In contrast, constructivist theories assume that it is initially encoded as lexicalized, verb-specific knowledge. In order to address this issue experimentally, we combined the preferential looking paradigm using pseudoverbs with the weird word order paradigm adapted to comprehension. The results, based on highly reliable, coder-independent eye-tracking measures, provide the first direct evidence that as early as 19 months French-speaking infants have an abstract representation of the word order of their language.

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This article appears IN Applied Psycholinguistics Vol. 34, Issue 2, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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