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Academic Paper


Title: On the articulatory classification of (alveolo)palatal consonants
Author: Daniel Recasens
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Linguistic Field: Phonetics
Abstract: Linguopalatal and sagittal vocal tract configuration data from a large number of languages reveal that the so-called palatal consonants (i.e. [ç ʎ c ɲ j]), as well as the vowel [], are often realized simultaneously at the alveolar and palatal zones. Moreover, while some of these sound categories may also exhibit a palatal constriction ([ç c ɲ ]), others are exclusively alveolar or alveolopalatal in line with the manner of articulation characteristics involved ([ʎ], also [ɕ] and [tʃ]). Consonants may favor one or more places of articulation and differ in fronting degree depending on the language taken into consideration; moreover, there appears to be a symmetry requirement by which consonants differing in manner, such as [] and [ɲ], may agree in place. The data reported in this paper argue in favor of a revision of the articulatory classification of palatal consonants by the International Phonetic Alphabet involving their subdivision into two classes, an alveolopalatal and a palatal one.

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This article appears IN Journal of the International Phonetic Association Vol. 43, Issue 1, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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