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Latin: A Linguistic Introduction

By Renato Oniga and Norma Shifano

Applies the principles of contemporary linguistics to the study of Latin and provides clear explanations of grammatical rules alongside diagrams to illustrate complex structures.


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The Ancient Language, and the Dialect of Cornwall, with an Enlarged Glossary of Cornish Provincial Words

By Frederick W.P. Jago

Containing around 3,700 dialect words from both Cornish and English,, this glossary was published in 1882 by Frederick W. P. Jago (1817–92) in an effort to describe and preserve the dialect as it too declined and it is an invaluable record of a disappearing dialect and way of life.


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Linguistic Bibliography for the Year 2013

The Linguistic Bibliography is by far the most comprehensive bibliographic reference work in the field. This volume contains up-to-date and extensive indexes of names, languages, and subjects.


Academic Paper


Title: Initial morphological learning in preverbal infants
Paper URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0010027711001806
Author: Alexandra Marquis
Email: click here to access email
Institution: Université de Montréal
Author: Rushen Shi
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://www.tpsycho.uqam.ca/NUN/D_pages_Profs/D_GRL/Anglais/people.htm
Institution: Université du Québec à Montréal
Linguistic Field: Cognitive Science; Language Acquisition; Morphology; Psycholinguistics
Subject Language: French
Abstract: How do children learn the internal structure of inflected words? We hypothesized that bound functional morphemes begin to be encoded at the preverbal stage, driven by their frequent occurrence with highly variable roots, and that infants in turn use these morphemes to interpret other words with the same inflections. Using a preferential looking procedure, we showed that French-learning 11-month-olds encoded the frequent French functor /e/, and perceived bare roots and their inflected variants as related forms. In another experiment an added training phase presented an artificial suffix co-occurring with many pseudo-roots. Infants learned the new suffix and used it to interpret novel affixed words that never occurred during the training. These findings demonstrate that initial learning of sub-lexical functors and morphological alternations is frequency-based, without relying on word meaning.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Publication Info: Cognition, Volume 122, Issue 1, January 2012, Pages 61–66
URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0010027711001806


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