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Latin: A Linguistic Introduction

By Renato Oniga and Norma Shifano

Applies the principles of contemporary linguistics to the study of Latin and provides clear explanations of grammatical rules alongside diagrams to illustrate complex structures.


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The Ancient Language, and the Dialect of Cornwall, with an Enlarged Glossary of Cornish Provincial Words

By Frederick W.P. Jago

Containing around 3,700 dialect words from both Cornish and English,, this glossary was published in 1882 by Frederick W. P. Jago (1817–92) in an effort to describe and preserve the dialect as it too declined and it is an invaluable record of a disappearing dialect and way of life.


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Linguistic Bibliography for the Year 2013

The Linguistic Bibliography is by far the most comprehensive bibliographic reference work in the field. This volume contains up-to-date and extensive indexes of names, languages, and subjects.


Academic Paper


Title: Estimating the number of segments for improving dialogue act labelling
Author: Vicent Tamarit
Institution: Universidad Politécnica de Valencia
Author: Carlos-D. Martínez-Hinarejos
Institution: Universidad Politécnica de Valencia
Author: José-Miguel Benedí
Institution: Universidad Politécnica de Valencia
Linguistic Field: Computational Linguistics; Text/Corpus Linguistics
Abstract: In dialogue systems it is important to label the dialogue turns with dialogue-related meaning. Each turn is usually divided into segments and these segments are labelled with dialogue acts (DAs). A DA is a representation of the functional role of the segment. Each segment is labelled with one DA, representing its role in the ongoing discourse. The sequence of DAs given a dialogue turn is used by the dialogue manager to understand the turn. Probabilistic models that perform DA labelling can be used on segmented or unsegmented turns. The last option is more likely for a practical dialogue system, but it provides poorer results. In that case, a hypothesis for the number of segments can be provided to improve the results. We propose some methods to estimate the probability of the number of segments based on the transcription of the turn. The new labelling model includes the estimation of the probability of the number of segments in the turn. We tested this new approach with two different dialogue corpora: Switchboard and Dihana . The results show that this inclusion significantly improves the labelling accuracy.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Natural Language Engineering Vol. 18, Issue 1, which you can read on Cambridge's site .



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