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Language Planning as a Sociolinguistic Experiment

By: Ernst Jahr

Provides richly detailed insight into the uniqueness of the Norwegian language development. Marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of the Norwegian nation following centuries of Danish rule


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Acquiring Phonology: A Cross-Generational Case-Study

By Neil Smith

The study also highlights the constructs of current linguistic theory, arguing for distinctive features and the notion 'onset' and against some of the claims of Optimality Theory and Usage-based accounts.


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Language Production and Interpretation: Linguistics meets Cognition

By Henk Zeevat

The importance of Henk Zeevat's new monograph cannot be overstated. [...] I recommend it to anyone who combines interests in language, logic, and computation [...]. David Beaver, University of Texas at Austin


Academic Paper


Title: Estimating the number of segments for improving dialogue act labelling
Author: VicentTamarit
Institution: Universidad Politécnica de Valencia
Author: Carlos-D.Martínez-Hinarejos
Institution: Universidad Politécnica de Valencia
Author: José-MiguelBenedí
Institution: Universidad Politécnica de Valencia
Linguistic Field: Computational Linguistics; Text/Corpus Linguistics
Abstract: In dialogue systems it is important to label the dialogue turns with dialogue-related meaning. Each turn is usually divided into segments and these segments are labelled with dialogue acts (DAs). A DA is a representation of the functional role of the segment. Each segment is labelled with one DA, representing its role in the ongoing discourse. The sequence of DAs given a dialogue turn is used by the dialogue manager to understand the turn. Probabilistic models that perform DA labelling can be used on segmented or unsegmented turns. The last option is more likely for a practical dialogue system, but it provides poorer results. In that case, a hypothesis for the number of segments can be provided to improve the results. We propose some methods to estimate the probability of the number of segments based on the transcription of the turn. The new labelling model includes the estimation of the probability of the number of segments in the turn. We tested this new approach with two different dialogue corpora: Switchboard and Dihana . The results show that this inclusion significantly improves the labelling accuracy.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Natural Language Engineering Vol. 18, Issue 1, which you can read on Cambridge's site .



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