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Academic Paper


Title: Contributions of phonetic token variability and word-type frequency to phonological representations
Author: LouAnn Gerken
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://www.u.arizona.edu/~gerken/
Institution: University of Arizona
Author: Diane K. Ohala
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: University of Arizona
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition; Phonology; Psycholinguistics
Abstract: The experiments here build on the widely reported finding that children are most accurate when producing phonotactic sequences with high ambient-language frequency. What remains controversial is a description of the input that children must be tracking for this effect to arise. We present a series of experiments that compare two ambient-language properties, token and type frequency, as they contribute to phonotactic learning. Token frequency is the raw number of exposures children have to a particular pattern; type frequency refers to a count of abstract entities, such as unique words. Our results suggest that children's production accuracy is most sensitive to a combination of type and token frequency: children were able to generalize a target phonotactic sequence to a new word when familiarized with multiple word-types across tokens from multiple talkers, but not when presented with either word-types with no talker variability or multiple talker-tokens of a single word.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Journal of Child Language Vol. 38, Issue 5, which you can READ on Cambridge's site .



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