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The Social Origins of Language

By Daniel Dor

Presents a new theoretical framework for the origins of human language and sets key issues in language evolution in their wider context within biological and cultural evolution


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Preposition Placement in English: A Usage-Based Approach

By Thomas Hoffmann

This is the first study that empirically investigates preposition placement across all clause types. The study compares first-language (British English) and second-language (Kenyan English) data and will therefore appeal to readers interested in world Englishes. Over 100 authentic corpus examples are discussed in the text, which will appeal to those who want to see 'real data'


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Academic Paper


Title: Children with Specific Language Impairment in Finnish: the use of tense and agreement inflections
Author: Sari Kunnari
Institution: University of Oulu
Author: Tuula Savinainen-Makkonen
Institution: University of Oulu
Author: Laurence B. Leonard
Institution: Purdue University
Author: Leena Mäkinen
Institution: University of Oulu
Author: Anna-Kaisa Tolonen
Institution: University of Oulu
Author: Mirja Luotonen
Institution: Oulu University Hospital
Author: Eeva Leinonen
Institution: King's College London
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition; Morphology; Psycholinguistics; Syntax
Subject Language: Finnish
Abstract: Children with specific language impairment (SLI) vary widely in their ability to use tense/agreement inflections depending on the type of language being acquired, a fact that current accounts of SLI have tried to explain. Finnish provides an important test case for these accounts because: (1) verbs in the first and second person permit null subjects whereas verbs in the third person do not; and (2) tense and agreement inflections are agglutinating and thus one type of inflection can appear without the other. Probes were used to compare the verb inflection use of Finnish-speaking children with SLI, and both age-matched and younger typically developing children. The children with SLI were less accurate, and the pattern of their errors did not match predictions based on current accounts of SLI. It appears that children with SLI have difficulty learning complex verb inflection paradigms apart from any problem specific to tense and agreement.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Journal of Child Language Vol. 38, Issue 5, which you can read on Cambridge's site .



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