Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Wiley-Blackwell Publisher Login
amazon logo
More Info


New from Oxford University Press!

ad

The Social Origins of Language

By Daniel Dor

Presents a new theoretical framework for the origins of human language and sets key issues in language evolution in their wider context within biological and cultural evolution


New from Cambridge University Press!

ad

Preposition Placement in English: A Usage-Based Approach

By Thomas Hoffmann

This is the first study that empirically investigates preposition placement across all clause types. The study compares first-language (British English) and second-language (Kenyan English) data and will therefore appeal to readers interested in world Englishes. Over 100 authentic corpus examples are discussed in the text, which will appeal to those who want to see 'real data'


New from Brill!

ad

Free Access 4 You

Free access to several Brill linguistics journals, such as Journal of Jewish Languages, Language Dynamics and Change, and Brill’s Annual of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics.


Academic Paper


Title: Review of M. Mous (2003) The Making of a Mixed Language: The case of Ma’a/Mbugu
Author: Steve Nicolle
Email: click here to access email
Institution: Africa International University
Linguistic Field: Language Documentation
Subject Language: Maa
Mbugu
Abstract: Ma’á/Mbugu is a Bantu language spoken in the Usambara area of North-East Tanzania. Two registers of the language are distinguished: Ma’á, or Inner Mbugu, and Normal Mbugu. Mous (2001a: 114) describes the two registers as “one language sharing one grammar,” which differ lexically./L//L/'The Making of a Mixed Language' is an excellent account of an endangered language, but it is more than that. Because of the nature of its parallel lexicon, Ma’á/Mbugu provides a fascinating insight into one of the possible outcomes of language contact. Mous confidently draws on a wide range of Bantu and Cushitic data in his reconstruction of the linguistic history of Ma’á/Mbugu, and yet his discussion does not feel cluttered. The story that he tells is more nuanced than in his previous publications on Ma’á/Mbugu, and is well worth hearing.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Publication Info: Journal of African Languages and Linguistics 27: 99-105.


Back
Add a new paper
Return to Academic Papers main page
Return to Directory of Linguists main page