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Academic Paper


Title: On the Translation of Implicit Information: Experimental evidence and further considerations.
Author: Steve Nicolle
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: Canada Institute of Linguistics
Linguistic Field: Pragmatics; Translation
Abstract: In this article I address the question of when a translator should make implicit information explicit, a topic discussed from the perspective of relevance theory by Tim Farrell and Richard Hoyle (1995, 1997), Christoph Unger (1996) and Ernst-August Gutt (1996). More specifically, the question is, When should a translator provide, either in the text or in a footnote, information which the original author left for readers to infer? In attempting to answer this, I suggest some practical guidelines for translators stemming from experimental evidence which suggests that the distinction between strong and weak implicatures (in the relevance theory sense) is central to the question of if and when to make implicatures explicit. I relate this experimental evidence to biblical passages and propose some general principles and heuristics for translation, focusing on the translation of implicit information.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Publication Info: SIL Notes on Translation 13(3): 1-12.


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