Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Publisher Login
amazon logo
More Info


New from Oxford University Press!

ad

Holy Sh*t: A Brief History of Swearing

By Melissa Mohr

Holy Sh*t: A Brief History of Swearing "contains original research into the history of swearing, and is scrupulous in analyzing the claims of other scholars."


New from Cambridge University Press!

ad

A New Manual of French Composition

By R. L. Graeme Ritchie

A New Manual of French Composition "provides a guide to French composition aimed at university students and the higher classes in schools. "


The LINGUIST List is dedicated to providing information on language and language analysis, and to providing the discipline of linguistics with the infrastructure necessary to function in the digital world. LINGUIST is a free resource, run by linguistics students and faculty, and supported primarily by your donations. Please support LINGUIST List during the 2016 Fund Drive.

Academic Paper


Title: Communicated and Non-communicated Acts in Relevance Theory.
Author: Steve Nicolle
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: Canada Institute of Linguistics
Linguistic Field: Pragmatics
Abstract: The main thrust of my argument is that all speech acts are communicated acts. The speech acts which have been characterised as non-communicated in relevance theory indicate either the strength with which an assumption is held or socially relevant information. In the first case, I argue that acts such as predicting, claiming or hypothesising, which indicate the strength with which an assumption is held, or the degree of speaker commitment to a proposition, must be identified in order for a hearer to determine the contextual effects of an utterance. Secondly, acts which indicate socially relevant information are, I argue, always worth recovering, since all information pertaining to social relations is highly relevant (in the relevance theory sense). Since the identification of all such acts is essential for the comprehension of the utterances through which they are performed, I conclude that they are communicated acts.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Publication Info: Pragmatics 10: 233-245.


Add a new paper
Return to Academic Papers main page
Return to Directory of Linguists main page