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It's Been Said Before

By Orin Hargraves

It's Been Said Before "examines why certain phrases become clichés and why they should be avoided -- or why they still have life left in them."

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Sounds Fascinating

By J. C. Wells

How do you pronounce biopic, synod, and Breughel? - and why? Do our cake and archaic sound the same? Where does the stress go in stalagmite? What's odd about the word epergne? As a finale, the author writes a letter to his 16-year-old self.

Academic Paper

Title: Communicated and Non-communicated Acts in Relevance Theory.
Author: Steve Nicolle
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: Canada Institute of Linguistics
Linguistic Field: Pragmatics
Abstract: The main thrust of my argument is that all speech acts are communicated acts. The speech acts which have been characterised as non-communicated in relevance theory indicate either the strength with which an assumption is held or socially relevant information. In the first case, I argue that acts such as predicting, claiming or hypothesising, which indicate the strength with which an assumption is held, or the degree of speaker commitment to a proposition, must be identified in order for a hearer to determine the contextual effects of an utterance. Secondly, acts which indicate socially relevant information are, I argue, always worth recovering, since all information pertaining to social relations is highly relevant (in the relevance theory sense). Since the identification of all such acts is essential for the comprehension of the utterances through which they are performed, I conclude that they are communicated acts.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Publication Info: Pragmatics 10: 233-245.
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