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Academic Paper

Title: Textual functions of Chidigo demonstratives
Author: Steve Nicolle
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: Canada Institute of Linguistics
Linguistic Field: Discourse Analysis
Subject Language: Digo
Subject LANGUAGE Family: Narrow Bantu; Central Narrow Bantu E
Abstract: Eastern Bantu languages typically have sets of at least three demonstratives, often with variant (both emphatic/reduplicated and phonologically reduced) forms. Many descriptive accounts focus on the spatial relations which demonstratives express, and this is reflected in the terms used to describe them: proximal (near to the speaker), distal (distant from the speaker or addressee), and non-proximal (near to the addressee). However, demonstratives do more than merely express spatial relations; they may also play an important role at the textual (that is, discourse) level, and not just as means of distinguishing participant reference. These discourse functions have received less attention, perhaps because to study them a large corpus of naturally occurring texts is required, and this is simply not available in many Bantu languages. /L//L/In this paper I will present an analysis, based on a corpus of approximately 14,000 words, of the textual functions of demonstratives in Chidigo (Digo: E.73; North-East Coast, Sabaki). Four types of demonstratives are distinguished, three of which have both a basic form and at least one variant form. In addition to spatial-deictic and textual uses, class 8 demonstratives are used to express time and manner; I will suggest correspondences between the functions of class 8 demonstratives when referring to entities and when referring to abstract qualities such as time and manner.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Publication Info: SOAS Working Papers in Linguistics 15: 159-171

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