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Linguistic Diversity and Social Justice

By Ingrid Piller

Linguistic Diversity and Social Justice "prompts thinking about linguistic disadvantage as a form of structural disadvantage that needs to be recognized and taken seriously."


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Language Evolution: The Windows Approach

By Rudolf Botha

Language Evolution: The Windows Approach addresses the question: "How can we unravel the evolution of language, given that there is no direct evidence about it?"


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Academic Paper


Title: Meta-analysis of the neural representation of first language and second language
Author: Rajani Sebastian
Institution: University of Texas at Austin
Author: Angela R. Laird
Institution: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Author: Swathi Kiran
Institution: Boston University
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Neurolinguistics; Psycholinguistics
Abstract: This study reports an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of published functional neuroimaging studies of bilingualism. Four parallel meta-analyses were conducted by taking into account the proficiency of participants reported in the studies. The results of the meta-analyses suggest differences in the probabilities of activation patterns between high proficiency and moderate/low proficiency bilinguals. The Talairach coordinates of activation in first language processing were very similar to that of second language processing in the high proficient bilinguals. However, in the low proficient group, the activation clusters were generally smaller and distributed over wider areas in both the hemispheres than the clusters identified in the ALE maps from the high proficient group. These findings draw attention to the importance of language proficiency in bilingual neural representation.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Applied Psycholinguistics Vol. 32, Issue 4, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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