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Academic Paper


Title: Collaborative Writing in L2 Contexts: Processes, Outcomes, and Future Directions
Author: Neomy Storch
Institution: University of Melbourne
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Language Acquisition
Abstract: Collaborative writing is the joint production of a text by two or more writers. Despite the widespread use of collaborative writing in the world outside the second language (L2) classroom, the use of collaborative writing tasks in L2 classes, to date, seems relatively limited. The overarching aim of this article is to suggest that collaborative writing activities, if carefully designed and monitored, may form an optimal site for L2 learning. The article begins by providing a brief theoretical rationale for collaborative writing, drawing on both cognitive and sociocultural theories. It then reviews the small number of published studies that have investigated collaborative writing in different L2 contexts. This review provides empirical evidence that working jointly on producing a written text provides opportunities for language learning, but that factors such as task type, L2 proficiency, and the relationships that the learners form affect these opportunities and may also affect language-learning gains. The chapter then considers new directions in implementing collaborative writing: online collaboration via wikis. The article concludes by highlighting the factors that need to be considered in order to maximize the language-learning potentials of collaborative writing in face-to-face and online modes.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Annual Review of Applied Linguistics Vol. 31, Issue 1, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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