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Vowel Length From Latin to Romance

By Michele Loporcaro

This book "draws on extensive empirical data, including from lesser known varieties" and "puts forward a new account of a well-known diachronic phenomenon."


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Letter Writing and Language Change

Edited By Anita Auer, Daniel Schreier, and Richard J. Watts

This book "challenges the assumption that there is only one 'legitimate' and homogenous form of English or of any other language" and "supports the view of different/alternative histories of the English language and will appeal to readers who are skeptical of 'standard' language ideology."


Academic Paper


Title: The Standard Language Situation in the Low Countries: Top-Down and Bottom-Up Variations on a Diaglossic Theme
Author: Stefan Grondelaers
Institution: Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen
Author: Roeland van Hout
Institution: Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen
Linguistic Field: Sociolinguistics
Subject Language: Dutch
Abstract: This paper reviews the available evidence in support of a diaglossic account (Auer 2005, 2011) of the 20th century history of Belgian and Netherlandic Dutch,
whereby the national varieties of Dutch are argued to be developing towards a stratificational configuration without discrete intermediate strata between the base dialects and the standard. However, we show that the processes leading to
diaglossia differ significantly in the two varieties. While the recent history of Netherlandic Dutch is characterized by downward norm relaxation (top to bottom), Belgian Dutch is characterized by bottom-up (re)standardization. Building on a refined version of Auer’s diaglossic model, we reflect on the exact nature of linguistic standardization in the Low Countries and outline scenarios for the further development of Belgian and Netherlandic Dutch.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Journal of Germanic Linguistics Vol. 23, Issue 3, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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