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A comprehensive history of slang in the English speaking world by its leading lexicographer.


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The Universal Structure of Categories: Towards a Formal Typology

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This book presents a new theory of grammatical categories - the Universal Spine Hypothesis - and reinforces generative notions of Universal Grammar while accommodating insights from linguistic typology.


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Academic Paper


Title: Subjectivity detection in spoken and written conversations
Author: Gabriel Murray
Institution: University of British Columbia
Author: Giuseppe Carenni
Institution: University of British Columbia
Linguistic Field: Computational Linguistics
Abstract: In this work we investigate four subjectivity and polarity tasks on spoken and written conversations. We implement and compare several pattern-based subjectivity detection approaches, including a novel technique wherein subjective patterns are learned from both labeled and unlabeled data, using n-gram word sequences with varying levels of lexical instantiation. We compare the use of these learned patterns with an alternative approach of using a very large set of raw pattern features. We also investigate how these pattern-based approaches can be supplemented and improved with features relating to conversation structure. Experimenting with meeting speech and email threads, we find that our novel systems incorporating varying instantiation patterns and conversation features outperform state-of-the-art systems despite having no recourse to domain-specific features such as prosodic cues and email headers. In some cases, such as when working with noisy speech recognizer output, a small set of well-motivated conversation features performs as well as a very large set of raw patterns.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Natural Language Engineering Vol. 17, Issue 3, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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