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The Language Hoax

By John H. McWhorter

The Language Hoax "argues that that all humans process life the same way, regardless of their language."


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Language and Development in Africa

By H. Ekkehard Wolff

Language and Development in Africa "discusses the resourcefulness of languages, both local and global, in view of the ongoing transformation of African societies as much as for economic development.. "


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Academic Paper


Title: An Emergentist Perspective on Heritage Language Acquisition
Author: William O'Grady
Institution: University of Hawai'i at Mānoa
Author: Hye-Young Kwak
Author: On-Soon Lee
Author: Miseon Lee
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Language Acquisition; Psycholinguistics
Abstract: It is widely recognized that the processor has a key role to play in creating and strengthening the mapping between form and meaning that is integral to language use. Adopting an emergentist approach to heritage language acquisition, the current study considers the extent to which the operation of the processor can contribute to an account of what is acquired, what is subsequently retained or lost, and what is never acquired in the first place. These questions are explored from two perspectives. First, morphosyntactic phenomena for which there is apparently substantial input are considered, with a focus on the relevance of salience, frequency, and transparency to the establishment of form-meaning mappings. Second, a phenomenon for which there appears to be relatively little input (i.e., scope) is examined with a view to understanding its fate in heritage language acquisition. In both cases, the emergentist perspective appears to offer promising insights into why heritage language learners succeed-and fail-in the way that they do.

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This article appears IN Studies in Second Language Acquisition Vol. 33, Issue 2, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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