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Presents a new theoretical framework for the origins of human language and sets key issues in language evolution in their wider context within biological and cultural evolution


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Preposition Placement in English: A Usage-Based Approach

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Academic Paper


Title: Adverbial Morphology: How Dutch and German are Moving Away from English
Author: Janneke Diepeveen
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://neon.niederlandistik.fu-berlin.de/en/diepeveen/
Institution: Freie Universität Berlin
Author: Freek van de Velde
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://wwwling.arts.kuleuven.ac.be/nedling/fvandevelde/index.htm
Institution: Université Catholique de Louvain
Linguistic Field: Historical Linguistics; Morphology
Subject Language: English
German
Dutch
Abstract: English marks the distinction between adjectives and adverbs with an adverbial suffix, whereas Dutch and German allow adjectives to be used adverbially without extra morphology. This may give rise to the idea that English, like Latin, is more specific in its classification of various types of modifiers. We propose an alternative analysis: Dutch and German draw a different dividing line, between attributive modifiers (NP-level) on the one hand, and predicative and adverbial modifiers (clause-level) on the other. To this end, they use adjectival inflection instead of derivational morphology. We describe how the adverbial systems in these three West-Germanic languages have developed and try to explain the changes that have occurred.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Journal of Germanic Linguistics Vol. 22, Issue 4, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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