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Academic Paper


Title: Relationships between lexical and phonological development: a look at bilingual children – a commentary on Stoel-Gammon's ‘Relationships between lexical and phonological development in young children’*
Author: Margaret Kehoe
Institution: Universität Hamburg
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Language Acquisition
Subject Language: English
Abstract: Stoel-Gammon (this issue) highlights the close and symbiotic association that exists between the lexical and phonological domains in early linguistic development. Her comprehensive review considers two bodies of literature: (1) child-centred studies; and (2) studies based on adult psycholinguistic research. Within the child-centred studies, both prelinguistic and early meaningful speech is examined. Stoel-Gammon organizes her review of child-centred studies around a series of postulates that capture the associations between lexical and phonological development and here she focuses primarily on normally developing children acquiring American English. My intention is not to question these postulates, which are based on established research findings, but to extend them beyond the limits of her review. In my commentary, I would like to explore the application of some of the stated postulates of the early meaningful speech period in children acquiring two or more languages. In so doing, I add a cross-linguistic dimension to the discussion; a dimension that Stoel-Gammon would like to see pursued in future research on this topic. I also expand our understanding of lexical–phonological relationships by considering the potential for in multiple lexical–phonological relationships.

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This article appears IN Journal of Child Language Vol. 38, Issue 1, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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