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Academic Paper


Title: The Functional Neuroanatomy of Morphology in Language Production
Paper URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.11.044
Author: Dirk Koester
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://www.d-koester.de
Institution: Universität Bielefeld
Author: Niels O. Schiller
Email: click here to access email
Institution: Leiden University Centre for Linguistics
Linguistic Field: Cognitive Science; Morphology; Psycholinguistics
Subject Language: Dutch
Abstract: This study investigated the neural correlates of morphological priming in overt Dutch language production using a long-lag priming paradigm. Compound words were read out loud as primes that were morphologically related to picture names (e.g. the word jaszak, 'coat pocket' was used for a picture of a coat; Dutch jas), or primes were form-related, but not morphologically related monomorphemic words (e.g. jasmijn, 'jasmine'). The morphologically related compounds could be semantically transparent (e.g. eksternest, 'magpie nest') or opaque (e.g. eksteroog, lit. 'magpie eye,' 'corn,' for a picture of a magpie, Dutch ekster). These four priming conditions were complemented by two, matched unrelated conditions. The production of morphologically related, complex words but not the production of form-related words facilitated subsequent picture naming. Also, morphologically related but not form-related words led to a neural priming effect in the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG). The effects did not differ for transparent and opaque relations. The results point to a functional role of LIFG in morphological information processing during language production contrary to meta-analytic findings. Specifically, morphological priming effects in language production seem to be independent from semantic overlap. However, further research should confirm the independence of morphological and phonological factors. It is suggested that LIFG subserves word form encoding in language production.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Publication Info: NeuroImage
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.11.044


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