Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Publisher Login
amazon logo
More Info

New from Oxford University Press!


It's Been Said Before

By Orin Hargraves

It's Been Said Before "examines why certain phrases become clichés and why they should be avoided -- or why they still have life left in them."

New from Cambridge University Press!


Sounds Fascinating

By J. C. Wells

How do you pronounce biopic, synod, and Breughel? - and why? Do our cake and archaic sound the same? Where does the stress go in stalagmite? What's odd about the word epergne? As a finale, the author writes a letter to his 16-year-old self.

Academic Paper

Title: Who speaks what to whom? Multilingualism and language choice in Misión La Paz
Author: Lyle Campbell
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: University of Hawai'i at Mānoa
Author: Verónica Grondona
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: Eastern Michigan University
Linguistic Field: Sociolinguistics
Subject Language: Chorote, Iyo'wujwa
Chorote, Iyojwa'ja
Wichí Lhamtés Güisnay
Wichí Lhamtés Nocten
Wichí Lhamtés Vejoz
Abstract: The multilingualism and patterns of language use in Misión La Paz, Salta Province, Argentina are described and analyzed. Three indigenous languages, Chorote, Nivaclé, and Wichí, are spoken here, but interlocutors in conversations usually do not speak the same language to one another. There is extensive linguistic exogamy, and husbands and wives typically speak different languages to one another. Individuals identify with one language, speak it to all others, and claim only to understand but not to speak the other languages spoken to them. Children in the same family very often identify with and thus speak different languages from one another. This situation is examined and explanations are offered, with comparisons to similar situations elsewhere. The pattern of language choice and multilingual use in this case is arguably unique, with implications for several general claims about language contact and multilingualism.


This article appears IN Language in Society Vol. 39, Issue 5.

Return to TOC.

Add a new paper
Return to Academic Papers main page
Return to Directory of Linguists main page