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The Social Origins of Language

By Daniel Dor

Presents a new theoretical framework for the origins of human language and sets key issues in language evolution in their wider context within biological and cultural evolution


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Preposition Placement in English: A Usage-Based Approach

By Thomas Hoffmann

This is the first study that empirically investigates preposition placement across all clause types. The study compares first-language (British English) and second-language (Kenyan English) data and will therefore appeal to readers interested in world Englishes. Over 100 authentic corpus examples are discussed in the text, which will appeal to those who want to see 'real data'


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Free Access 4 You

Free access to several Brill linguistics journals, such as Journal of Jewish Languages, Language Dynamics and Change, and Brill’s Annual of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics.


Academic Paper


Title: The phonetic status of the (inter)dental approximant
Author: Kenneth S. Olson
Institution: SIL International & University of North Dakota
Author: Jeff Mielke
Email: click here to access email
Institution: University of Ottawa
Author: Josephine Sanicas-Daguman
Institution: Translators Association of the Philippines
Author: Carol Jean Pebley
Institution: SIL International
Author: Hugh Paterson
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://thejourneyler.org
Institution: SIL International & University of North Dakota
Linguistic Field: Phonetics
Subject Language: Kagayanen
Abstract: The (inter)dental approximant is a little-studied speech sound in the Philippines and Western Australia. In this paper, we document the articulation of the sound, providing acoustic and video data from Kagayanen and Limos Kalinga, respectively. The sound is attested in at least fifteen languages. It is contrastive in five Western Australian languages, while in the Philippines it generally patterns as an allophone of // but has emerged recently as a separate phoneme due to contact. It arose independently in the two regions. The sound is easily describable in terms of values of phonological features or phonetic parameters. All of these factors argue for the inclusion of the sound in the International Phonetic Alphabet.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Journal of the International Phonetic Association Vol. 40, Issue 2, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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