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Words in Time and Place: Exploring Language Through the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary

By David Crystal

Offers a unique view of the English language and its development, and includes witty commentary and anecdotes along the way.


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The Indo-European Controversy: Facts and Fallacies in Historical Linguistics

By Asya Pereltsvaig and Martin W. Lewis

This book "asserts that the origin and spread of languages must be examined primarily through the time-tested techniques of linguistic analysis, rather than those of evolutionary biology" and "defends traditional practices in historical linguistics while remaining open to new techniques, including computational methods" and "will appeal to readers interested in world history and world geography."


Academic Paper


Title: The Time Course of Lexical Access in Morphologically Complex Words
Paper URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WNR.0b013e328335b3e0
Author: Thomas C. Gunter
Institution: Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences
Author: Dirk Koester
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://www.d-koester.de
Institution: Universit├Ąt Bielefeld
Linguistic Field: Cognitive Science; Morphology; Psycholinguistics
Abstract: Compounding, the concatenation of words (e.g. dishwasher), is an important mechanism across many languages. This study investigated whether access of initial compound constituents occurs immediately or, alternatively, whether it is delayed until the last constituent (i.e. the head). Electroencephalogram was measured as participants listened to German two-constituent compounds. Both the initial as well as the following head constituent could consist of either a word or nonword, resulting in four experimental conditions. Results showed a larger N400 for initial nonword constituents, suggesting that lexical access was attempted before the head. Thus, this study provides direct evidence that lexical access of transparent compound constituents in German occurs immediately, and is not delayed until the compound head is encountered.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WNR.0b013e328335b3e0


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