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Vowel Length From Latin to Romance

By Michele Loporcaro

This book "draws on extensive empirical data, including from lesser known varieties" and "puts forward a new account of a well-known diachronic phenomenon."


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Letter Writing and Language Change

Edited By Anita Auer, Daniel Schreier, and Richard J. Watts

This book "challenges the assumption that there is only one 'legitimate' and homogenous form of English or of any other language" and "supports the view of different/alternative histories of the English language and will appeal to readers who are skeptical of 'standard' language ideology."


Academic Paper


Title: Cross-linguistic evidence for the nature of age effects in second language acquisition
Author: Robert DeKeyser
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://www.newsdesk.umd.edu/experts/experts.cfm?type=cat&category_id=17&expert_id_all=1956319622R
Institution: University of Maryland
Author: Iris Alfi-Shabtay
Institution: Tel Aviv University
Author: Dorit Diskin Ravid
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://www.tau.ac.il/education/homepg/dorit-ravid.htm
Institution: Tel Aviv University
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Psycholinguistics
Abstract: Few researchers would doubt that ultimate attainment in second language grammar is negatively correlated with age of acquisition, but considerable controversy remains about the nature of this relationship: the exact shape of the age-attainment function and its interpretation. This article presents two parallel studies with native speakers of Russian: one on the acquisition of English as a second language in North America (n< = 76), and one on the acquisition of Hebrew as a second language in Israel (n = 64). Despite the very different nature of the languages being learned, the two studies show very similar results. When age at testing is partialed out, the data reveal a steep decline in the learning of grammar before age 18 in both groups, followed by an essentially horizontal slope until age 40. This is interpreted as evidence in favor of the critical period. Both groups show a significant correlation between ultimate attainment and verbal aptitude for the adult learners, but not for the early learners. This is interpreted as further evidence that the learning processes in childhood and adulthood not only yield different levels of proficiency but are also different in nature.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Applied Psycholinguistics Vol. 31, Issue 3, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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