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Academic Paper


Title: Second language acquisition, teacher education and language pedagogy
Author: Rod Ellis
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://www.arts.auckland.ac.nz/staff/index.cfm?S=STAFF_rell035
Institution: University of Auckland
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Language Acquisition
Abstract: Various positions regarding the Second Language Acquisition (SLA) – Language Pedagogy (LP) nexus have been advanced. Taking these as a starting point, this article will examine the nature of the SLA/LP relationship both more generally and more concretely. First, it will place the debates evident in the different positions regarding the relationship in a broader educational and professional context by examining the nature of the theory/practice nexus – because the issues at stake do not just concern SLA. Second, it will examine critically a number of options for bridging the divide (e.g. through presenting the pedagogical implications of research, engaging teachers in researching their own classroom or promoting research–teacher collaboration). Third, it will probe the relationship in terms of a framework that links (i) SLA researchers, (ii) classroom researchers, (iii) teacher educators and (iv) language teachers. This framework will serve as a basis for formulating a set of eleven principles that can guide attempts to use SLA theory and research in teacher education programmes.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Language Teaching Vol. 43, Issue 2, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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