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Academic Paper


Title: NP focus and non canonical arguments in Èdó
Author: Ota Ogie
Email: click here to access email
Institution: Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Linguistic Field: Syntax
Subject Language: Edo
Abstract: In this paper I examine extraction in Èdó. The analysis presented here is restricted to NP focus constructions and is descriptive in nature . Èdó uses phonological as well as syntactic means to register extraction locally. Under syntactic marking, a pronominal element, which does not agree with, the extracted argument, can appear in the extraction site. I refer to this element as a plug. Plugs mark the extraction sites of extracted subjects, objects in double object constructions and some indirect object constructions. Plugs are different from resumptive pronouns. While plugs occur under NP focus, resumptive pronouns occur under left dislocation in Èdó. In addition, NP focus strategy respects the standard island constraints while left dislocation may violate these constraints. I will argue that plugs are not resumptive pronouns./L/Under phonological marking, Èdó employs two strategies to register direct object extraction: either as a tone shift or as a suffix on the selecting head to indicate a reduction in syntactic valence.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Publication Info: Papers in linguistics from the University of Manchester: proceedings of the 9th postgraduate conference in Linguistics 25 March 2000. K. Hiietam & C. R Schubert (eds.),78-89. Department of Linguistics, University of Manchester.


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