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The Language Hoax

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The Language Hoax "argues that that all humans process life the same way, regardless of their language."


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Language and Development in Africa

By H. Ekkehard Wolff

Language and Development in Africa "discusses the resourcefulness of languages, both local and global, in view of the ongoing transformation of African societies as much as for economic development.. "


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Academic Paper


Title: Universal production patterns and ambient language influences in babbling: A cross-linguistic study of Korean- and English-learning infants*
Author: Sue Ann S Lee
Institution: Oklahoma State University
Author: Barbara L. Davis
Institution: University of Texas at Austin
Author: Peter F MacNeilage
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: University of Texas at Austin
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition; Phonetics
Subject Language: English
Korean
Abstract: The phonetic characteristics of canonical babbling produced by Korean- and English-learning infants were compared with consonant and vowel frequencies observed in infant-directed speech produced by Korean- and English-speaking mothers. For infant output, babbling samples from six Korean-learning infants were compared with an existing English babbling database (Davis & MacNeilage, ). For ambient language comparisons, consonants and vowels in ten Korean and ten English infant-directed speech (IDS) samples were analyzed. The two infant groups demonstrated similar consonant patterns, but showed different vowel patterns from one another. For both languages, infant vowel patterns were related to those of ambient language IDS. Ambient language patterns were manifested in infant vowel output, perhaps because vowels are more perceptually and motorically available in the input and output capacities of babbling infants.

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This article appears IN Journal of Child Language Vol. 37, Issue 2, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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