Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Publisher Login
amazon logo
More Info


New from Oxford University Press!

ad

A History of the Irish Language: From the Norman Invasion to Independence

By Aidan Doyle

This book "sets the history of the Irish language in its political and cultural context" and "makes available for the first time material that has previously been inaccessible to non-Irish speakers."


New from Cambridge University Press!

ad

The Cambridge Handbook of Pragmatics

Edited By Keith Allan and Kasia M. Jaszczolt

This book "fills the unquestionable need for a comprehensive and up-to-date handbook on the fast-developing field of pragmatics" and "includes contributions from many of the principal figures in a wide variety of fields of pragmatic research as well as some up-and-coming pragmatists."


Academic Paper


Title: Visual and auditory input in second-language speech processing
Author: Debra M Hardison
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://www.msu.edu/~hardiso2/
Institution: Michigan State University
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Language Acquisition
Abstract: The majority of studies in second-language (L2) speech processing have involved unimodal (i.e., auditory) input; however, in many instances, speech communication involves both visual and auditory sources of information. Some researchers have argued that multimodal speech is the primary mode of speech perception (e.g., Rosenblum 2005). Research on auditory-visual (AV) input has been conducted more extensively in the fields of infant speech development (e.g., Meltzoff & Kuhl 1994), adult monolingual processing (e.g., McGurk & MacDonald 1976; see reference in this timeline), and the treatment of the hearing impaired (e.g., Owens & Blazek 1985) than in L2 speech processing (Hardison 2007). In these fields, the earliest visual input was a human face on which lip movements contributed linguistic information. Subsequent research expanded the types of visual sources to include computer-animated faces or (e.g., Massaro 1998), hand-arm gestures (Gullberg 2006), and various types of electronic visual displays such as those for pitch (Chun, Hardison & Pennington 2008). Recently, neurophysiological research has shed light on the neural processing of language input, providing another direction researchers have begun to explore in L2 processing (Perani & Abutalebi 2005).

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Language Teaching Vol. 43, Issue 1, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



Add a new paper
Return to Academic Papers main page
Return to Directory of Linguists main page