Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Wiley-Blackwell Publisher Login
amazon logo
More Info


New from Oxford University Press!

ad

The Vulgar Tongue: Green's History of Slang

By Jonathon Green

A comprehensive history of slang in the English speaking world by its leading lexicographer.


New from Cambridge University Press!

ad

The Universal Structure of Categories: Towards a Formal Typology

By Martina Wiltschko

This book presents a new theory of grammatical categories - the Universal Spine Hypothesis - and reinforces generative notions of Universal Grammar while accommodating insights from linguistic typology.


New from Brill!

ad

Brill's MyBook Program

Do you have access to Dynamics of Morphological Productivity through your library? Then you can by the paperback for only €25 or $25! Find out more about Brill's MyBook program!


Academic Paper


Title: Visual and auditory input in second-language speech processing
Author: Debra M Hardison
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://www.msu.edu/~hardiso2/
Institution: Michigan State University
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Language Acquisition
Abstract: The majority of studies in second-language (L2) speech processing have involved unimodal (i.e., auditory) input; however, in many instances, speech communication involves both visual and auditory sources of information. Some researchers have argued that multimodal speech is the primary mode of speech perception (e.g., Rosenblum 2005). Research on auditory-visual (AV) input has been conducted more extensively in the fields of infant speech development (e.g., Meltzoff & Kuhl 1994), adult monolingual processing (e.g., McGurk & MacDonald 1976; see reference in this timeline), and the treatment of the hearing impaired (e.g., Owens & Blazek 1985) than in L2 speech processing (Hardison 2007). In these fields, the earliest visual input was a human face on which lip movements contributed linguistic information. Subsequent research expanded the types of visual sources to include computer-animated faces or (e.g., Massaro 1998), hand-arm gestures (Gullberg 2006), and various types of electronic visual displays such as those for pitch (Chun, Hardison & Pennington 2008). Recently, neurophysiological research has shed light on the neural processing of language input, providing another direction researchers have begun to explore in L2 processing (Perani & Abutalebi 2005).

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Language Teaching Vol. 43, Issue 1, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



Back
Add a new paper
Return to Academic Papers main page
Return to Directory of Linguists main page