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Academic Paper


Title: Orthographic and phonological effects in the picture–word interference paradigm: Evidence from a logographic language
Author: Yanchao Bi
Institution: Beijing Normal University
Author: Yaoda Xu
Institution: Harvard University
Author: Alfonso Caramazza
Institution: Harvard University
Linguistic Field: Cognitive Science; Phonology; Psycholinguistics; Writing Systems
Subject Language: Chinese, Mandarin
Abstract: One important finding with the picture–word interference paradigm is that picture-naming performance is facilitated by the presentation of a distractor formally related to the picture name. In two picture-naming experiments we investigated the nature of such form facilitation effect with Mandarin Chinese, separating the effects of phonology and orthography. Significant facilitation effects were observed both when distractors were only orthographically or only phonologically related to the targets. The orthographic effect was overall stronger than the phonological effect. These findings suggest that the classic form facilitation effect in picture–word interference is a mixed effect with multiple loci: it cannot be attributed merely to the nonlexical activation of the target phonological segments from the visual input of the distractor. It seems instead that orthographically only related distractors facilitate the lexical selection process of picture naming, and phonologically only related distractors facilitate the retrieval of target phonological segments.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Applied Psycholinguistics Vol. 30, Issue 4, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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