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Language Planning as a Sociolinguistic Experiment

By: Ernst Jahr

Provides richly detailed insight into the uniqueness of the Norwegian language development. Marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of the Norwegian nation following centuries of Danish rule


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Acquiring Phonology: A Cross-Generational Case-Study

By Neil Smith

The study also highlights the constructs of current linguistic theory, arguing for distinctive features and the notion 'onset' and against some of the claims of Optimality Theory and Usage-based accounts.


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Language Production and Interpretation: Linguistics meets Cognition

By Henk Zeevat

The importance of Henk Zeevat's new monograph cannot be overstated. [...] I recommend it to anyone who combines interests in language, logic, and computation [...]. David Beaver, University of Texas at Austin


Academic Paper


Title: 'Learner Versus Nonlearner Patterns of Stylistic Variation in Synchronous Computer-Mediated French'
Author: RémiAvan Compernolle
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: 'http://www.personal.psu.edu/rav137/'
Institution: 'Carnegie Mellon University'
Author: LawrenceWilliams
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: 'http://www.forl.unt.edu/~lfw/'
Institution: 'University of North Texas'
Linguistic Field: 'Applied Linguistics'
Subject Language: 'French'
Abstract: This study analyzes stylistic variation among first-, second-, and third-year instructed learners of French engaged in synchronous French-language computer-mediated communication (CMC) and compares the results with data from nonlearner discourse in a public, noneducational synchronous CMC environment. We focus specifically on variability in 'yes/no' question (YNQ) structures and the use of the pronouns 'nous' "we" and 'on' "one" or "we" for first-person plural reference. The results suggest that whereas first- and second-year learners rarely use informal variants, third-year students approximate-but do not actually reach-native-speaker norms. Contrary to expectations, however, no positive correlation was found between the increased use of the informal pronoun and the informal YNQ structure. Finally, we argue for more in-depth case studies that combine analyses of performance data, competence data, and individual learner histories to determine when, why, and how second language users begin to recognize and emulate native speakers' sociolinguistic norms and variation.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Studies in Second Language Acquisition Vol. 31, Issue 3, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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